Going on a Bear Hunt


Going on a bear hunt can be the adventure of a lifetime. However, a successful hunting trip requires a great deal of preparation. Scouting to locate a habitat rich in bears, choosing a hunting method and planning for extraction of your harvest are important components in arranging for a productive hunt.

There is a popular children’s song about going on a bear hunt. The song mentions a plethora of minor obstacles that must be conquered while searching for this elusive bear. Finally, after the hunter has gained victory over these particular hindrances, he finds the brawny brute hiding in a cave. The hunter’s response is to turn around and run.




A serious hunter would have scouted the area in advance, packed in a firearm or archery equipment and planned for extraction of his harvest. Then, he would have taken aim and bagged that rascal.

Bear hunting requires skill and a great deal of preparation. A hunter does not simply meander into bear territory, bag a bear and carry it to the pick-up truck. Detailed planning is a requirement for a successful hunt and harvest in bear country.

Bear hunting is a serious sport and requires a great deal of planning in advance. Do an ample amount of springtime scouting. Locate bear country. Decide on your method of hunting. Will you hunt over bait or spot and stalk? Will you choose archery or gun? How will you be getting your bear home once you’ve bagged him? Take time to answer all of these questions and adequately prepare yourself to enjoy the hunt.

Very large mature wild bear

Very large mature wild bear

Scouting is the first step on your way to success. Spring is an excellent time to begin searching for sign. If there are bears in the area, you will find that bark has been stripped away from some of the trees in their effort to consume the sapwood found just beneath that outer layer. You will also find claw marks on trees, as well as areas where bears have rubbed against the trunks, leaving behind their scent and a few strands of hair. An occasional bear track in the mud would be the tie that binds all of these components together. If all of these signs are present, you can rest assured there are hunting opportunities in that area.




Now that you’ve located bear country, it’s time to decide what style of hunt will work best for you. Depending on local regulations, you may choose to hunt over a baited area, or use the spot and stalk method of hunting. You may also decide whether to take your bear with a traditional firearm, modern gun, or maybe even a bow. No matter what style of hunt you choose, patience is mandatory. Due to your time spent scouting, you know there are bears in the area. Now, you must give them an opportunity to show themselves.

The most important part of this experience does not involve scouting or choosing the precise location for your hunt. The top priority in planning a successful hunt is being prepared to haul out your harvest. A bear is generally a large animal and cannot simply be thrown over one’s shoulder and toted out of the woods. Extraction of your animal will require a well thought out plan.


Bear Hunt

There are three common methods of removing large game from the hunting site. One of the simplest methods of removal involves using a specially constructed sled system to haul your bear out of the woods with minimal effort. A second technique of retrieval involves using a wheeled game cart to bring your harvest to your pick-up truck. The third approach is to field dress your animal where it lies. Then, pack out the meat in bags made especially for that purpose. All three methods work, but none of them are effortless. You must be capable of participating in somewhat strenuous activity in order to get your harvest from the woods to your vehicle or base camp.

It is vital that you are prepared in advance to haul out your game. If you allow yourself to bring down a bear, but fail to equip yourself to carry it out, you are committing one of the cardinal sins of hunting. You must always have a workable plan for getting your animal from the woods to your freezer.

Bear hunting is a serious sport and requires a great deal of planning in advance. Do an ample amount of springtime scouting. Locate bear country. Decide on your method of hunting. Will you hunt over bait or spot and stalk? Will you choose archery or gun? How will you be getting your bear home once you’ve bagged him? Take time to answer all of these questions and adequately prepare yourself to enjoy the hunt.